UK +44 (0) 203 397 4970 | US +00 (1) 844 671 2872

Biz-Growth Part 01 – How Do I Find My Ideal Clients?

Are you struggling to identify your ideal client?

 

 

What you will learn:

What platforms work best for a variety clients

What does it take to nurture your ideal clients

Why it is important to share Value with your potential clients

How to turn your potential clients in to hot prospects

How to find your ideal clients

Summary

You will be diving deep and cutting through the noise, as Alex and Rupert talk you through the best platforms for each market …

With 25 years experience of trying and testing different marketing approaches, you will reap the rewards of that hard work by joining the video on ‘How Do I Find My Ideal Clients’.

Transcript:

 

ALEX:                   

Hello everyone, welcome back. Once again I’m Alex, this is Rupert, from Business Growth Bureau. Thank you again for joining us. I suppose it would be good to start with actually what people can expect to see out of this video. It’s going to be short, five or six minutes long, but we’re going to be going into the heart of, how do I find my ideal client?

I suppose to kick it off, Rupert, in a broad sense how do you segment down and actually find who your ideal clients are? (0:26)

 

RUPERT:

A great question. I think one of the things I should lead in with first which ties in exactly with that question is, for example, we all agree I’m sure that some of the best ways of getting new clients are through referrals or recommendations.

 

ALEX:                   

That’s a very good point. (0:39)

 

RUPERT:

And obviously, networking can be a great place to find people but again if you go about things the right way. What we’ll talk about here is more about leveraging technology, especially now, in terms of finding your ideal type of clients, and a lot of that is about really trying to dig down deep and not trying to reach everyone.

 

ALEX:                   

And before we go on to the technology side of it, some people watching may not be that tech savvy at the moment. What are the organic ways, or more importantly what are the ways that I, as an individual, without social media or technology, what ways can I generate leads and find my ideal clients. (1:15)

 

RUPERT:

Well if you’re not talking about using the technology platforms, for example, it would be if you’ve already got existing customers, probably going back to your existing clients and asking them to give you a referral, especially if they’re happy.

 

ALEX:

And how do you feel about things like networking, referral, business events and things like that, is that a dying art, face to face? (1:34)

 

RUPERT:

Oh no, it’s definitely a really good thing to do and obviously if there are some exhibitions or seminars you can go to, you meet some great people in that space.

 

ALEX:                   

I suppose it would be a great distinction here for you to ask questions such as what products we’re actually selling, because if we’re in a very consultative sale where it’s a very bespoke solution, I suppose face to face is always going to win over anything else. (2:00)

  

RUPERT:

Yes, it is, but the great thing is with technology now, for example, a lot of our meetings we were having to physically go and see clients, which we love doing, but of course you spend an awful lot of time travelling, whereas of course these days with using webinar technology and video conferencing, it’s accessible to pretty well all of us now. We’ve done some fantastic deals just using those technologies alone.

 

ALEX:                   

For the viewers watching, what would you say are the top three technologies to use, either social media or platforms to use, to not only target but actually get in front of the right clients, what would you say is the top one and the second and third? (2:41)

  

RUPERT:

It depends on who you’re trying to reach, but if for example you’re trying to reach people who are predominantly in the business to business space or business to charity space, then LinkedIn at the moment is probably one of the best platforms out there.

 

ALEX:                   

I know on LinkedIn you can have – and people at home may not know this – but you can have various accounts on LinkedIn. Which do you think is the best if I’m on a bit of a budget or if I’m trying to reach my ideal clients, what is the best one to go for, for both on a budget and for my ideal client? (3:09)

  

RUPERT:

If you’ve got a low budget and a limited amount of time to invest or don’t have the knowledge then you could just do quite a bit with the free version of LinkedIn.

 

ALEX:                   

And can I get a good result from that still? (3:20)

  

RUPERT:

You will, but a lot of people tend to play at it, and the risk with that is that the results for me have therefore been very limited.

 

ALEX:                   

In that case, if budget’s not that much of a concern and I’ve got a bit of extra money that I can put into my marketing, what approach would you take? (3:37)

 

 RUPERT:

Let’s assume you’ve got £60 or £70 a month to spend or perhaps $80 or $90 if you’re in the US, then we’d probably recommend you upgrade to something like Sales Navigator, because the search capabilities there are very advanced and also there’s much less in the way of restrictions on how you use your account.

 

ALEX:                   

That’s the top one, so the top one that Rupert and I are recommending would be LinkedIn and if you can afford the budget it would be Sales Navigator. What would be second and third top platforms you would say? (4:05)

  

RUPERT:

Again it depends on the target audience, but if you’re selling more of a consumer based product it may well be Facebook and obviously there’s some very good targeting on Facebook. You’ve obviously got Twitter if you want to disseminate a lot of the information to a lot of people, and of course now, especially if you’re offering something very visual which might be clothing or whatever it may be, Instagram is now owned by Facebook as well and Instagram is a really good platform to look at as well.

 

ALEX:                   

I suppose it would be a good time to tell the people watching, social media is something that is booming at the moment, it’s on the climb, we all know that. Everybody’s on their phone, we all know it’s consumed in the amounts it is, but I suppose we should give people the knowledge that we are actually going to do an entire series, or an entire video actually, on social media. We’ve only touched on things like LinkedIn and things like that today.

Using those platforms, how do I find my ideal clients? (5:00)

  

RUPERT:

It’s a really good question, because some of these platforms are just so big. For example, if you look at LinkedIn alone, it’s got 600 million people on it worldwide now, nearly 700 million. In the UK alone it’s 23 million or 18 million active accounts. So if you try and reach everyone, your effort will be far too diluted. So it really is a case of trying to look at some of your existing clients, where your existing business has come from, or if you can’t do that because you’re a very new business about trying to closely identify the people you’re trying to reach, not just on where they’re based and on level of seniority and industry sector but also possibly even look at elements of persona around that as well.

 

ALEX:                   

And for the people watching, what are five things that they can write down to help them now? So, if you are watching, I suppose grab a pen and paper. What are five things, Rupert, that people can do on social media platforms to help them segment down? Do I look at, say, seniority level, do I look at turnover, do I look at location? What are five things that people can write down at home and go away and start doing on a daily basis? (6:10)

  

RUPERT:

There’s some great things you can do to identify who you’re trying to reach. On LinkedIn, there’s 147 industry classifications.

 

ALEX:                   

So the number one thing would be, the first thing to maybe write down is, look at the actual industry that you’re trying to go after. What would be the second thing? (6:24)

  

RUPERT:

The second thing would be to look at potential level of seniority. It might be Director, CXO.

 

ALEX:                   

So it could be, is the Managing Director the decision maker, it is the procurement officer, HR? What would be the third thing? (6:38)

 

RUPERT:

The other part that would be good to look at would be company size, so you can break it down by the number of employees.

 

ALEX:                   

Or by turnover? (6:44)

 

RUPERT:

Actually, that’s one thing you can’t do through LinkedIn. Obviously in the US you’ve got a different way of searching, but you can’t base it on the turnover on LinkedIn.

 

ALEX:                   

And the fourth thing would be? (6:54)

  

RUPERT:

Some other areas you could look at, one of the most powerful things you’ve got is a key phrase search on LinkedIn.

 

ALEX:                   

And what would the fifth and final thing be? If I’m trying to find my ideal client, we’ve got the four that we already mentioned but what would be the fifth thing that people could do right now that would be able to enable them to start looking at and finding their ideal clients? (7:15)

 

RUPERT:

Also, you’ve probably got your own first level of connections, you’re predominantly trying to reach people who are not in your immediate first level network. So filtering by second and third level connections can also give you some really amplified results out of that.

 

ALEX:                   

Do certain people in certain industries respond better? So, the people at home may be using social media or using techniques like face to face, do certain industries perform quite well? Or more importantly, which ones do I want to avoid? (7:45)

 

RUPERT:

That’s a really good question actually. Out of the 147 LinkedIn industry classifications, we believe that about 125 of those are pretty good. Areas which can prove more challenging, certainly in the UK, and it’s probably not dissimilar in other markets, for example, local and central government can be a little bit more difficult; police; armed forces.

 

ALEX:                   

These are for obvious reasons, aren’t they, because if you’re quite high up in the police or if you’re in the public sector, social media’s not a massive presence for them really. (8:17)

  

RUPERT:

And also the other thing is, head of tenders, they don’t really want people approaching them all day long on LinkedIn, so you tend to find they’re not particularly engaged. But the other ones, you can get some really good results. People make the mistake of assuming that LinkedIn isn’t a serious platform for finding clients; believe me, you can get some amazing results.

 

ALEX:

I suppose it would be a good way to wrap up that we actually, with our clients, this is the kind of question that we’re presented with, these are things that we actually go through with our clients. I suppose if you want to delve into a little bit more about this, it would probably be worth actually getting in touch with us – Business Growth Bureau. Not only can we provide you tools on how to ask these questions, but actually how do I do this within my own business?

We’ve actually come up with our own free scorecard for you to use to actually be able to ask these questions within your own business and actually start to delve down and find, who are my ideal clients and where are they? I suppose that’s the best way to finish this up. (9:17)

 

RUPERT:

Yes, that’s good. I think there’s one other thing I’d just add to that is also think about, some of the things aren’t always immediately obvious. So, for example, you can’t filter by age on LinkedIn, but what you can do is filter by years of experience. So sometimes it’s about thinking very laterally about how you can reach people. So it’s not always the obvious things, so that’s more possibly focusing on the persona element of how to identify people.

But yes, really drill down as much as you can and break those numbers down to as small as possible segments, and you can really then hone down your campaign and get some really good niched results for your chosen target market.

 

ALEX:                   

Perfect, thank you so much for watching. If you’ve got this far, you must have enjoyed the content. If you have, it would be wonderful if you could leave a comment. Your feedback is our oxygen, so thank you so much. I’m Alex Smith and Rupert Honywood, Business Growth Bureau. Thank you so much. (10:08)

 

RUPERT:

Cheers.