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BizGrowth Part 05: Lead Generation System – Part 1

Everything you need to know to be in front of your ideal clients

This video will teach you:

How to use the right tools to find your clients

Tricks you could be missing out on

The best preforming platforms to use right now

How to capture and engage with your target audience

The importance between providing value before closing the sale!

How you can prevent the usual 30% decay of email data per year

Summary

Welcome, you’re about to learn about how Business Growth Bureau fine-tunes its search criteria to target the clients that are most suited to their business and how you can do the same … You will learn where to find your ideal leads and discover the platforms used to not only find your ideal clients, but also how you could potentially get them to buy from you. Done correctly, this is how you can generate 8 – 13 hot prospects out of every 100 leads so that they are asking to have sales based conversations.

Transcript:

 

ALEX:

Hello everyone, welcome back. I’m Alex Smith, Rupert Honywood, Business Growth Bureau. This is episode five, this is the lead generation side of it all. So in the last episode we gave you an introduction as to what’s coming now, so this is lead generation, after this is prospect nurturing and then we’re going to be moving on to actual sales optimisation.

In this one, we’re going to be trying to tackle what we think are the top biggest things to worry about in terms of lead generation, in terms of how to do it, and we’re going to start from different platforms to start with and then we’ll delve into each.

So the first one, I suppose, let’s go with Google. Everybody knows about Google, everyone knows about things like Pay Per Click and stuff like that. What’s your opinion on Pay Per Click and should I be using it? (0:36)

  

RUPERT:

Google and Pay Per Click can work very well. The thing is, you have to think an awful lot about the people you’re trying to target. So for example, one of the big challenges is that some of the key phrases or key words you want to use are really expensive, so for example you could pay anything from 50p, which doesn’t sound like very much, all the way to £5, £10, £20 per click or even more. And remember a click is just purely a click, that is a click through to your website, it doesn’t mean they’re going to take any form of action at all.

 

ALEX:

So a good thing to take away from that is to think about, although a click sounds impressive you could actually get no result from it, so even if your website is very well optimised, you’re only getting someone to the website, you’re not actually getting someone to the product, they’re not going through to buy a service, so just bear that in mind. (1:23)

 

RUPERT:

That’s right, and bear in mind that when someone goes to your website you’ve probably got 5, 6, 7, 8 seconds to grab someone’s attention before they’re off again. So that’s all you’re talking about in a lot of cases. The way you can bring the cost per click down is to actually use what are classed as ‘long tail keywords’, but you have to be quite expert at that, maybe for your target market you might have to develop 200 or 300 long tail keywords.

 

ALEX:

It might be worth mentioning, just to take away from that then, for you to go away and research what long tail keywords actually are. Because they could actually work quite well for you. So if you’re not limited on cash but you want to make a bit of an impact, for the minimal amount of cost, long tail keywords could be a great way for you to move forward with that. (2:10)

 

RUPERT:

That can be very good. Also where Pay Per Click can have a big plus, it tends to be quite immediate, so you can decide to spend perhaps £150, £100, £200, whatever that sum of money is, and try out lots of different types of messages and see what works and what doesn’t work, and a lot of it is about experimentation. And then added to which of course you ideally want people going to a highly optimised landing page on your website to actually tie in with that message you’re putting out on Google or Facebook or wherever it may be.

 

ALEX:

Of course. So the good thing to take away from that is that Pay Per Click can work, but start low. Start with, say, £100, £200 to see what kind of keywords work and then maybe ramp that up. (2:53)

  

RUPERT:

Very importantly from that, when you’ve got people to the website, the way something is worded on your website can make a massive difference and the way you encourage people to opt in. So for example, if you put the word ‘free’ in there, then of course you’re going to be getting a lot of people who perhaps don’t actually want to pay for stuff. On the other hand, ‘free’ is one of the most powerful words you can use. So when you get people to the website, the landing page needs to be very well developed to get people’s attention, have a lot of positive reinforcement in there, and it shouldn’t be basically just your website, it needs to be a particular landing page. And you may have multiple landing pages to suit different key phrases or words.

 

ALEX:

It might be worth mentioning at this point as well, especially as we’re on the lead generation side and the Pay Per Click side of it, is to think not just about getting the click, it’s how much value can you put behind that click, or how much value can you put on that landing page. An example of that is, we produce these videos, not in a hope to get you to our website but just to share our name and how much value we’ve potentially got to share around this kind of industry. So think about what you’re currently doing now with your current efforts, and Pay Per Click could be a very good way forward, but at the same time, think about how much value you’re putting to your clients before. How much knowledge and content are you sharing with the industry before you get them to the website, before they actually discover your products and want to buy your services, what are you doing to get them to that point?

Which brings us quite nicely onto email marketing. (4:21)

 

RUPERT:

Email marketing can be a great space to operate in. Obviously there’s two main things to bear in mind with email marketing now. First of all, because everyone’s doing it, it can be difficult to rise above the noise. The other thing is, if you’re based in Europe or in the UK, you’ve got new legislation around GDPR which unfortunately is a very boring subject, but it has made some of this a little bit more difficult, especially if you’re trying to sell to individual consumers rather than businesses.

 

ALEX:

In that case, and that’s a great point, for the people watching, because I know I use email marketing within our organisation and I know it works very well, but for the people watching, what would be the top three tips to take away from email marketing? I’ll throw the first one in – the title, the strap line. How you engage with people and how you grab their attention is so important from the first off. So we find something along the lines of, not giving away what you’re actually trying to get to them but asking a question in the email, is really important.

For example, with us it would be ‘What could you do extra with 8 to 13 hot prospects?’ That’s one of our strap lines. And that makes you start thinking about what you would actually do with extra activity and so on. So, what would be two other top tips for email marketing? (5:36)

 

RUPERT:

With email marketing, first of all remember – let’s forget about the compliance part for the moment because that’s quite a complex area in its own right – remember to treat people as individuals as much as you can. It may be, especially the first one or two or three emails you’re just sharing massive amounts of value along the lines we’ve been talking about already, and there’s a ratio which is like an unspoken ratio but for every five emails that you send out, four of them are sharing value and all the good stuff around that and only one possibly contains some form of sales message in there.

Otherwise, what will happen is, people will just unsubscribe and your mailing list will go down to virtually nothing.

 

ALEX:

So that’s the second thing. What would be the third tip to take away? (6:26)

 

RUPERT:

Be very careful if you’ve actually bought any lists, again about compliance. For example, if you get a very high bounce rate you could find you get blocked by your ISP or blacklisted by Google as well, and there’s all sorts of things that you need to be careful about that. Make sure your emails are very engaging, and think about smart ways of connecting and engaging with people so they want to move things onto the next step.

 

ALEX:

I don’t personally answer to this but you might, and for people watching at home, is there a way, if I have an email list right now, is there a way of me cleansing it at all so that I can see whether this data is actually still valid? (6:58)

 

RUPERT:

That’s a really good point because the actual decay rate on an email list is around 30% per year on average, and if you were getting a 30% bounce rate again that’s very much in the danger territory. So if your list is more than six months old and you haven’t been regularly messaging people, i.e. you’ve not been maintaining your list, what you’ll find is a large part will go out of date. Also, people forget they’ve subscribed so the risk is that they could hit the report button again.

So to actually validate email addresses, if you’re in the B2B space or if you use LinkedIn, if you believe you know what the email address is but you’re not 100% sure, there’s a tool which you can use which LinkedIn have actually acquired called Rapportive. It used to be an independent product. And that’s quite a good way of actually testing whether that email address is still valid or not.

 

ALEX:

Just for everyone watching, what’s that programme called? (7:52)

 

RUPERT:

It’s called Rapportive.

 

ALEX:

And is that an app on my phone or what is it? (7:56)

  

RUPERT:

It’s a plugin which I believe goes into Chrome along with LinkedIn. So that’s a very good way. There are other validation methods as well, some are rather hit and miss though, so be a little bit careful about some of those.

 

ALEX:

Let’s move on to social media. Obviously I’m a fanatic about social media and I’m sure you watching now are either understanding the importance of it – because if you found our video you obviously understand the importance of social media and you know the power it’s got, especially for the future. Because of how broad this subject could be, let’s just tackle the top three or four of which we use in the B2B space at the moment, which sometimes spills over into B2C. Top B2B social media platforms right now, what are they? (8:41)

 

RUPERT:

Well, LinkedIn is probably the first one. At the moment, they’ve got nearly 700 million businesses on there or people in association with a business. In the UK alone it’s something like 23 million currently and even if you said 4 or 5 million profiles are a little bit dormant that’s still 18 million people on LinkedIn. Remember, people are representing themselves in a personal capacity but in association with their business or their employment.

 

ALEX:

At this point, for that method and for any on social media, it would be great to go back to what we’ve said and what we will be covering on the next episode about that importance of building the relationship of trust. On any form of social media, don’t just go straight out with ‘buy my stuff’. Think about what you’re doing in terms of sharing value before; think about what you’re doing to actually engage with people before you’re asking them to sign on the dotted line.

What would be the second platform right now? (9:31)

 

RUPERT:

The second platform probably would be Facebook and Facebook is very good both through groups and pages but also some of the power through advertising and contacts where those advertisements effectively follow you around can be very powerful. There is a bit of a crossover with what you use Facebook for and LinkedIn, and it’s certainly a very good platform to look at.

 

ALEX:

And then the third one, I’m fanatic about Instagram and I’m thinking you’re probably going to say the same. Instagram for us is so good simply because it’s visual, you can flick through pictures, you can get a great point across through pictures, and you can add a bit of text to it. Why do you think, Rupert, that Instagram is so important right now? (10:13)

 

RUPERT:

I think first of all it’s very visual, it’s very up and coming. The fact that Facebook have acquired Instagram, some people were very sceptical about that to start with but overall it is working pretty well. Also the way you can incorporate videos and stories in there and swipe up and all this type of stuff is absolutely great.

But there is, I think there’s also a fourth one which it’s very easy to forget about now because it possibly seems a bit less hip and trendy, but we shouldn’t forget about Twitter as well, and the reason that Twitter is still very relevant is that you get people out there who’ve got a massive presence on there, it’s really good if you want to share a lot of content and be able to click through to different posts on your website and other type of stuff as well. So, Twitter’s got a massive following and is particularly good if you want to broadcast messages.

 

ALEX:

We’ve released our podcast now as well which people hopefully are listening to as well, so if you’re listening to this on podcast, thank you. I suppose as well, audio is, I think, in terms of the future, gaining mass amounts of information. The problem with video, although you’re watching this right now hopefully, the problem with video is you can’t watch and drive, you can’t watch and do the washing up, you can’t watch and do the cooking at home, because you need your hands, whereas audio is the future in terms of being able to consume content. It would be quite good to talk about that for a second. What do you think about audio? (11:38)

 

RUPERT:

Well, I think audio is very powerful and I think you and I are big fans of Audible but obviously you’ve got podcasts through iTunes and all this other kind of stuff, which is fantastic. A great point that Alex made there. Interestingly enough, I was explaining at a conference the other day that I’ve got a video series which I particularly like and it’s one I quite like to watch every now and again, but because it is video, I have watched it on video a couple of times, but because the content is so good I have actually converted that video into audio so I can listen to it in the car.

 

ALEX:

I suppose, not to contradict what we’re saying now, but I suppose just a way of finishing this series off is to say, think about the way that you’re producing your content at the moment. If it is video, think about how you can move that over to audio, things like podcasts and so on, downloadable content is going to be so powerful in the future, especially as you can listen to it on the go, you can continue to do most things while listening to your podcast still and not worrying about having to stream video. So that would be a great way of wrapping that up, do you think? (12:42)

  

RUPERT:

.Yes, I think it is, although I think in reality what we’ve both realised between us is that this is a much bigger subject than we first thought, so I think we’re going to end up having a lead generation part two which will be in the next video which will be looking a lot more at things like segmentation as well. So I think the fact we’ve covered all these topics now, hopefully we’ve got massive amounts of value.

 

ALEX:

We’ve opened up a can of worms! Thank you so much for watching us, I’m Alex Smith, this is Rupert Honywood, Business Growth Bureau. Thank you so much for watching. Like I always say, your feedback is our oxygen, we love hearing what our clients and what you potentially think of us, so if you have enjoyed it or if you haven’t, leave a comment in below, we’d love to hear your feedback and we’ll see you on the next video. Thank you so much. (13:21)

  

RUPERT:

Thank you.